Date

Citation – Primary Source

Event / Description

PDF_LINK_PHOTO_W_ICON

01/09/1847

“To The People of California.” California Star, January 9, 1847: p. 4, col. 1. California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu.

“The California Battalion of Mounted Riflemen will be kept in service of the Territory, and constantly on duty to prevent and punish the aggressions by the Indians or any other persons upon the property of individuals, or the peace of the Territory…
R.E. Stockton, Commander-In-Chief and Governor of the Territory of California, Ciudad de los Angeles, August 17, 1846”

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01/28/1847

“An Ordinance Respecting the Employment of Indians.” The Californian, January 28, 1847: p. 2, col. 2. California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu

 

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02/20/1847

“ A PROCLAMATION To The Inhabitants of the Northern District of California, California Star, February 20, 1847: p. 4, col. 3. California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu.

“If having come to the knowledge of the Commander in Chief of this District, that certain persons have been and still are imprisoning and holding to service Indians against their will, and without any legal contract, and without a due regard to their rights as free men when not under legal contract for services – It is hereby ordered that all persons so holding or detaining Indians shall release them, and permit them to return to their houses unless they can make a contract with them which shall be acknowledged before the nearest Justice, which contract, shall be binding upon both parties.”

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03/06/1847

“It seems from the proceedings…” California Star, March 6, 1847: p. 2, col.2. California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu.

“It seems from the proceedings of a meeting held in Sonoma a few days since…that the Indians have recently evinced a hostile disposition towards the settlers in the northern part of the country. We trust Gen. Kearny will comply with the reasonable request of the people of that section, as expressed in their public meeting.”

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03/13/1847

“Public Meeting at Sonoma.” California Star, March 13, 1847: p. 1, col.1. California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu.

“At a meeting of the citizens of Sonoma and its vicinity, held for consideration their present exposed situation arising from information…that several bands of wild Indians not far distant from this place, are uniting together for the purpose of making depredations upon the white inhabitants and have already commenced by stealing horses and have recently killed a white man…”

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03/20/1847

“We learn from a letter…” California Star, March 20, 1847: p. 2, col.1. California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu.

“We learn from a letter by the launch Sacramento…that the Digger Indians in the upper part of the Sacramento valley had become hostile to the settlers in that section, and had committed depredations. Capt. Kern commander of the Sacramento district with twenty men, had gone up the valley for the purpose of chastising them.”

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03/27/1847

“A Company of thirty Californians…” California Star, March 27, 1847: p. 2, col. 2. California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu.

“A Company of thirty Californians under Don Felipe Butron and Don Joaquin de la Torre – as Lieuts is now being raised here, to unite with a force, about to be sent against the horse thief Indians.”

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03/27/1847

“We learn from persons who have recently arrived…, California Star, March 27, 1847: p. 4, col. 1. California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu.

“We learn from persons who have recently arrived from Monterey that a small party of volunteers returning from the South were attacked while in their camp near St. Johns, by a party of hostile Indians of the ‘Horse-thief tribe.’ This occurred about ten days ago. It being night, the men being unarmed, and not apprehending danger from the Indians so near to the Seat of Government were not prepared to defend themselves.”

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04/03/1847

“The recent hostilities…” California Star, April 03, 1847: p. 2, col. 2. California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu.

“The recent hostilities of the Indians in the upper country, and the probability of their continuance, render it necessary that an Indian agent should be appointed to reside at Fort Sacramento or near there. Capt. J.A. Sutter is a suitable person for that office.”

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04/10/1847

“Hostile Indians.” California Star, April 10, 1847: p. 2, col. 2. California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu.

“Persons who have recently come in from the San Joaquin region, bring information that the Indians in that section are becoming very troublesome. They has stolen a number of horses and cattle, and it is believed that they will venture to attack the settlements…”

In the Sacramento Valley, Capt. Kern with Indian soldiers chased and attacked “hostile Indians” twenty were killed.

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04/10/1847

“Still Later from the Frontier.” California Star, April 10, 1847: p. 2, col. 2. California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu.

“News reached here on Wednesday last by way of the Pueblo of San Jose, that about two weeks since, the hostile “horse thief” Indians, to the number of several hundred attacked the settlement recently formed on the San Joaquin, and killed every person in it; none escaped.”

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04/10/1847

“For the California Star – Mr. Editor.” California Star, April 10, 1847: p. 2, col. 2. California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu.

Mission of Santa Clara; Stanislaus river; Mokelumny river; Pueblo of St. Joseph; Contra Costa

Mr. Lindsay; Mr. Wilson; Mr. Webber; Capt. Fisher; Mr. Burnal
Letter to Editor to address what will be done about “horse thief” Indians; recounts incidents during Mexican period, whites killed by Indians, including Jose Jesus, Simeon, Felipe

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04/17/1847

“Army Items.” California Star, April 17, 1847: p. 4, col. 1. California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu.

“A portion of the troops which left here a few days since, for Monterey, are destined for service against the Indians in the Tuleres, who have recently been very troublesome in their thefts and depredations.”

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04/17/1847

“For the California Star…” California Star, April 17, 1847: p. 5, col. 2. California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu.

San Joaquin River; Stanislaus; New Hope; Taltolomes stream; River Mercy
Publication of a massacre on the San Joaquin by the Star was in error; reports Indians steal on occasion but have not attacked or harmed settlers; are fishing and drying salmon in great quantities

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05/01/1847

“In answer to many complaints…” California Star, May 1, 1847: p. 2, col. 1-2. California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu.

“In answer to many complaints…in reference to the depredations of the ‘horse thief’ Indians of the Sierra Nevada, we can only express our belief from such information that we can obtain, that Gov. Kearny is taking the most efficient measures for the suppression of these outrages.”

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05/08/1847

“I visited Mission San Gabriel…” California Star, May 8, 1847: p. 3, col. 1. California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu.

“The Indians are becoming troublesome, even here, and a number of skirmishes have occurred between them and companies to chastise them.”

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06/19/1847

“A report has reached this place…” California Star, June 19, 1847: p. 2, col. 3. California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu.

“A report has reached this place, that the Indians on the San Joaquin have stolen all the horses and mules of Gen. Kearney’s camp. How well founded the report is we are not able to determine…”

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06/26/1847

“Indian Tradition of the Bay of San Francisco.” California Star, June 26, 1847: p. 3, col. 2. California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu.

 

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07/24/1847

“The Indians Again.” California Star, July 24, 1847: p. 2, col. 1. California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu.

“…we have tidings of an outrage committed by the whites upon a defenceless encampment of Indians, 60 miles north of New Helvetia…The Spaniards, having partaken of their [Indians] hospitatlity, commenced making prisoners of men, women, and children, and in securing them, some ten or twelve were killed – shot by the Spaniards in attempting to escape. Thirty were secured, principally women and children, tied together and driven to the settlements. Young children who were unable to proceed were murdered on the road. In one instance, an infant was taken from its mother, and killed in her presence, and that too, in the most brutal manner.”

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07/24/1847

“Cal. Star’s Sacramento Correspondent – Crops – The Fourth at the Fort – Indians.” California Star, July 24, 1847: p. 2, col. 3, p. 3, col. 1. California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu.

Indian labor used to harvest crops

Describes first Fourth of July celebration in California; various troop and camp movements of Sutter, Kearny

Page 3, col. 1: “Some Californians I am told have been at their old game, committing horrid outrages on the defenceless Indians, killing, taking prisoners and making slaves of them, I forebear mentioning names, the  Sub Indian agent has sent his report to our worthy Governor, and there is no doubt, but he will handle the wretches without gloves.”

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08/14/1847

“For the Cal. Star.” California Star, August 14, 1847: p. 2, col. 3, 3-1. California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu.

“Sir, allow me through the medium of the columns which have kindly been opened to me during my brief stay beneath your roof, after having been driven from my post by the hostile Indians of the San Joaquin valley, B.K. Thompson”

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08/14/1847

“From Oregon.” California Star, August 14, 1847: p. 2, col. 2. California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu.

 

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08/14/1847

“We present in today’s paper.” California Star, August 14, 1847: p. 2, col. 3. California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu.

 

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09/15/1847

“A Trip to the Sacremento.” California Star, September 15, 1847: p. 2, col. 3, p. 3, cols.1-2. California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu.

First voyage from San Francisco to Sacramento Valley; describes in detail landscape, rivers, natural resources, J.A. Sutter’s fort; comments and parentheticals re: Indians in derogatory terms: “(what is lower on the scale of humanity than a California Indian?)”; reports sickness occurring during the summer and fall months that has killed Indians in large numbers.

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09/18/1847

“Circular to Indian Agents and Others.” California Star, Halleck, H.W., September 18, 1847: p.3, col. 3.

 

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09/25/1847

“Alta California.” California Star, September 25, 1847: p.1, col. 2.

States that military colonization is recommended – New York Herald

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10/23/1847

“Cal Star’s Sacramento Correspondence – American Fork.” California Star, October 23, 1847: p.3, col. 1. California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu.

Describes in detail water (Sacramento, San Joaquin, Juba) and timber resources; states “I was told by a gentleman, a few days since, that the Indians were industrious, and used the axe and cross-cut saw very well, and that their labor can be procured, payable in clothing, on very reasonable terms.”

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12/08/1847

“Proclamation.” The Californian, Mason, R.B., December 8, 1847: p.3, col. 3.

States that there will be a fine and imprisonment for those convicted of selling liquor to Indians. Repeated in English and Spanish: December 15, 1847: p.4, col.3, December 22, 1847: p.4, col.1, December 29, 1847: p.4, col.2, January 5, 1848: p.4, col.1, January 12, 1848: p.4, col.2, January 19, 1848: p.4, col.1, January 26, 1848: p.4, col.1, February 2, 1848: p.1, col.2.

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12/11/1847

“We should like to hear of something being done…” California Star, December 11, 1847: p.2, col. 2.

Requests better laws to govern Indians.

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